Try These Tasty Red Meat Substitutes

While many may find red meat irresistible, there are a few long term studies that have recently been concluded, and these prove that eating too much red meat, especially if it is processed, is likely to shorten your life. However, if being a vegetarian does not appeal to you, there are still plenty of other tasty red meat substitutes that you can start to incorporate into your diet.

salmon
Fish
While fish and meat are often grouped together, fish contains significantly less saturated fat than meat, and is full of omega-3 fatty acids, which benefit a number of different areas in terms of health. While some fish may not feel like a substantial substitute for red meat, there are others that can most definitely hold their own. Salmon, whether you grill, smoke or bake it, is a hearty and flavorful fish, while the mild flavor of rainbow trout is ideal for those who do not usually like seafood. Halibut is another versatile fish, as is Sablefish, also known as black cod, which is known for its incredibly buttery texture.

Tofu
Even the most avid meat eaters should really be taking a break from eating meat at least once a week, but if you still want a protein that is substantial, tofu is a great option. Tofu can easily replace the meat in just about all of your favorite recipes, whether you cook up some crispy nuggets or some Chinese sweet and sour or an Italian dish of spaghetti and meatballs.

Chicken
Free Range Chicken
While chicken is lower in fat and calories than most red meats, you need to be aware of where the chicken has come from. If it has been raised on a farm that freely uses antibiotics in order for their animals to grow faster and bigger, which is extremely common in the poultry industry, then this meat will definitely not be good for your health. While free range, organic chicken may cost more, the price is worth paying, as not only will the meat be better for you, but it will also be far tastier, and packed with more vitamins and minerals. Chicken is one of the most versatile meats out there, and can be cooked in so many different ways, whether it be in a curry or as a roast.

pork
Pork Tenderloin
While many may believe that pork is packed with cholesterol and fat, this depends on the cut of pork that you choose. Instead of opting for bacon, try cooking up a pork tenderloin, as this is a lean meat that is low in fat. It is also extremely easy to cook, and can simply be left slow cooking all day, along with some vegetables, so that you can enjoy a hearty meal in the evening.

Red meat is a favorite of many, but, if you know that you are indulging in this slightly too often, now is the time to change your eating habits. Whether you substitute it for a hearty fish or a cut of organic chicken, these red meat alternatives will give a huge boost to your overall health.

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Eat More Oily Fish

Salmon

Scientific interest in oily fish first arose when researchers discovered that Eskimos, who have a diet that is primarily made up of oily fish, experience a much lower than average rate of heart attacks, strokes and other diseases. Since then, the many health benefits that oily fish can bring to the body have been heavily documented, making this a food that you should be making the effort to eat much more.

What Are Oily Fish?
Oily fish are specific species of fish that contain certain oils that run throughout their body, while white fish only contains oil in its liver. Some of the most readily available of oily fish would be mackerel, sardines, herring, trout, salmon, kipper and whitebait, and these count as an oily fish whether they are fresh, frozen, smoked or canned. While fresh tuna is also considered to be an oily fish, canned tuna is not, as the canning process takes its levels down to that of a white fish, making it not as beneficial.

Highly Nutritious
Oily fish is the best natural source of omega-3 fatty acids that you will find, and these are essential for a wide variety of functions within the body, as well as the brain, and have been directly linked to a reduction in many diseases. In addition to the omega-3 fatty acids, oily fish also contains a variety of other nutrients that the average person usually does not consume enough of, such as vitamin D, some of the B vitamins, and selenium.

Health Benefits
Oily fish bring about some incredible health benefits, such as the prevention of heart disease and up to a 50% reduced risk of rheumatoid arthritis, both of which have been scientifically proven. The omega-3 fatty acids in oily fish also help to protect the vision, as well as improve the memory and inhibit the growth of oral and skin cancers. Pregnant women that consume oily fish in the last few months of their pregnancy will also be able to boost their child’s sensory, motor and cognitive development, giving him or her a fantastic start to life.

How Much to Eat
The recommended amount of oily fish to eat each week is between one and two portions, with each portion weighing around 140 grams. The main downside to oily fish is that they contain certain pollutants that are present throughout the environment, usually as a result of industrial processes and household fires, and while these pollutants will not have an immediate effect on your health, high levels of these in your body can lead to problems arising over time.

In some parts of the world, oily fish features heavily in the diet, and these areas experience a significantly reduced amount of heart disease and other health issues. With so many different types of oily fish out there, it is an easy food to consume more of, and there are a number of exciting ways in which you can cook the fish to make it appealing even to those that are not usually fans of seafood.