What to Add to Your Winter Diet

Research has shown that the food that you eat in these colder months has a significant impact on the way in which your body, as well as your mind, deals with this harsher weather. To keep you in the healthiest shape possible, OROGOLD has put together a quick guide on what you should be adding to your winter diet.

Clementine

Winter Fruits
There are certain winter fruits, especially of the citrus variety, that bring the body some amazing health benefits. Clementines are packed with vitamins, nutrients and plenty of fiber, all of which help to boost the immune system – something that is needed in the winter. Grapefruit is full of antioxidants, and will also lower cholesterol and curb hunger, while stimulating collagen production for fresh, glowing skin. Pomegranates are another fruit that help to stimulate collagen production, while lemons contain some powerful electrolytes.

Walnuts.

Nuts
Nuts are low in saturated fats and high in vitamins and minerals, as well as the mono-saturated fats that are required for a healthy heart. OROGOLD recommends stocking your pantry with a variety of nuts, from walnuts to pecans to almonds, and incorporating them into as many meals as possible.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal
A warm bowl of oatmeal is a fantastic snack during the winter, as oatmeal is a complex carbohydrate that is high in fiber, meaning that it will give you more energy for longer. Winter is also the time of the year when the serotonin levels in our body are quite low, as this feel-good chemical needs sunshine for maximum production. Luckily, certain foods, oatmeal included, are able to boost serotonin production within the body, helping to restore the levels in your brain to what they were at the height of the summer.

Beet salad

Root Vegetables
Root vegetables are able to warm the body, and most of them contain high levels of beta-carotene, which is essential for your immune system during the winter. Beets are packed with nutrients, and also contain tryptophan and betaine, two chemicals that are able to create a sense of happiness within the brain. Sweet potatoes are another root vegetable that have so many different benefits, and since they have a relatively long shelf life, you don’t need to eat them all straight away. Many root vegetables are also able to withstand the cold, meaning that you are likely to be able to find fresh produce throughout the winter.

Broccoli.

Broccoli and Cauliflower
Broccoli and cauliflower are both packed with vitamin C, which your body needs in large doses throughout the winter t keep your immune system in top shape. These two vegetables are a great defense against those pesky winter sniffles, and even if you can’t find them fresh, OROGOLD advises that you still look for frozen varieties, as these are still extremely nutritious.

With a slight adjustment to your diet, it does not need to be hard to stay healthy this winter. From incorporating a range of winter fruits into your daily diet, to sticking to healthy snacks, such as oatmeal or nuts, these winter foods are guaranteed to get you through even the coldest of months.

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Skin Redness – What Helps, What Doesn’t – OROGOLD Reviews

Young woman touching her red cheeks Skin redness is an issue that many people suffer from, and, unfortunately, there is no single cause of this problem. Whether you suffer from a chronic skin condition, such as rosacea, or a temporary sensitivity, such as contact dermatitis, it is always important that you know the difference between what is going to help you, and what might just make it even worse.

Anti-Redness Diet
This diet focuses on reducing the inflammation that occurs within the body, clearing away any internal heat that is likely to have built up. The meals that you eat should be predominantly vegetable-based, with a side portion of a rice or sweet potato dish. Foods to avoid include soy, dairy, wheat, nuts, eggs, corn and shellfish, and your intake of sugar and sweeteners should be limited. Avoid food and drinks that contain ‘heat’, such as spicy food, alcohol and hot beverages.

Applying honey to the skinHoney
Honey has many anti-inflammatory properties, and manuka honey, produced by bees that feed on the flowers of the manuka tree, is especially high in antioxidants. It also has antibacterial effects that benefit acne, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis, and should be applied directly to the skin each day to eliminate redness, as well as keep skin moisturized. When buying manuka honey, look for one that has a UMF/OMA rating of at least 15, as this rating system, developed by scientists in New Zealand where the honey is from, describes the activity level of the honey.

Oatmeal 
Oatmeal, colloidal oatmeal in particular, is a natural remedy that is used to help skin redness. If the redness is occurring mostly on your face, make a facial mask from it by mixing a couple of teaspoons of colloidal oatmeal with some water, and applying it to your face for ten minutes, about 4 times a week. You can also regularly take oatmeal baths, which will help to soothe the skin all over your body.

Taking a hot showerAvoid Hot Showers
Hot, or even really warm, water can have a negative effect on your skin, washing away all of its essential oils and moisture, and leaving you with skin that is dry, scaly, and possibly red. To avoid this, stick to warm showers that do not last for more than 10 minutes. You should also avoid using hot water when cleansing your face, and purchase a makeup remover that does not need to be rinsed off.

Healing Teas
Certain teas have also been seen to be very beneficial in combating skin redness. Green tea works especially well for rosacea patients, whilst chamomile and peppermint tea helps any sort of facial redness. In addition to drinking the teas, you can also make a topical compress from them, pouring cooled, steeped tea onto a cloth and pressing it onto your face for 1 minute, a couple of times a day.

No matter what the cause of your skin redness may be, there are many steps that you can take to help to reduce this. If the redness is worrying you in any way, it would be best to seek the advice of a dermatologist, so that you can better understand the possible underlying cause of the issue.