Easy Ways to Up Your Turmeric Intake

A cup of golden milk made of turmeric

Turmeric is an ingredient that originates from South India, but has recently been receiving worldwide recognition for all of the health benefits that it brings. From easing arthritis to preventing cancer, here are a few easy ways to increase your intake of this superfood.

Golden Milk
Golden milk is one of the most effective ways to take turmeric, and only takes a few minutes to make. Simply mix some turmeric and ginger in with milk, and then bring this to a boil. Turn off the heat, leave to cool, and then add a small amount of raw honey to sweeten it. If you plan on drinking the golden milk before bed, as this is fantastic for promoting quality sleep, also add in a bit of nutmeg, cinnamon, and cardamom, as these help to magnify the effects of the turmeric.

Turmeric with Eggs
Eggs are a food that are commonly eaten for breakfast, and are great at disguising the taste of turmeric. Since egg dishes tend to mostly be yellow, this also hides the color of the turmeric, making it great for fussy eaters. When cooking the eggs, try to use coconut oil if possible, as this will bring its own set of health benefits with it.

Juice It
If you would prefer to consume turmeric in its freshest state, try seeing if you can purchase some turmeric root. This can then be juiced into your regular juices, although you will only need to use a thumb-sized piece of the root with each serving. Studies have shown that incorporating turmeric into a daily green smoothie can reduce inflammation in the body by up to 90%.

Raw chicken marinated with turmeric and other spices

Cooking with Turmeric
Many people believe that turmeric can only really be used in curries and Indian dishes, but this is far from the truth. There are so many dishes that work well with turmeric in it, with the ingredient enhancing dishes such as carrot soups and lentil stews. You can also disguise turmeric well in rich tomato sauces, and then use this for everything from pasta to pizza.

Baking with Turmeric
In addition to incorporating turmeric into your main meals, you can also try baking with it. There are many dessert recipes out there that include some turmeric, from scones to pound cakes, so have a look online to see what appeals to you the most.

Golden Paste
Golden paste, which is made from water, oil, turmeric and black pepper, makes the turmeric extremely bioavailable, making this the option to go for if you need quick results. However, many people find the taste of golden paste to be difficult to stomach, and would prefer to take it as a pill instead. Fortunately, this is easy to do yourself at home, requiring nothing but a pot of golden paste and some pill-shaped molds. Fill these molds with the golden paste and then freeze, taking them two to three times a day for best results.

Turmeric is an ingredient that just about everybody could benefit from, as it boosts the health in so many different ways. Even if you do not personally enjoy the taste of turmeric, these tips will help you to incorporate more of it into your everyday life, in easy and tasty ways.

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Navigating Your Way Through the Bread Aisle

Smiling bespectacled woman holding bread

The bread aisle is an area of the average grocery store that has significantly grown in recent years, with so many new additions to now consider. From added fibre to gluten-free, here are a few tips to help you to navigate your way around the bread aisle.

Whole Grain vs Refined
One of the biggest decisions that people usually make when it comes to bread is deciding between whole grain varieties or refined, white varieties. You are likely already aware of the fact that whole grain is much healthier, as this contains the outer bran layer of the grain, which is where the majority of the fibre can be found. White bread is created from a refined version of these grains, meaning that all that is left is the starch. Make sure that the bread that you buy actually states that it is whole what, whole rye, whole spelt or cracked wheat, because terms such as wheat flour, enriched wheat and unbleached wheat are simply other names for refined flour.

Added Fibre
While whole grain bread already contains much more fibre than refined white bread, many brands add in some extra fibre, and this is usually positive. They do this by adding ingredients such as flaxseed, oats, psyllium or wheat bran to their bread mix, resulting in much higher fibre levels per slice.

Different Types of Flour
While wheat may be the most popular flour used for bread, there are several other types of flour that you are likely to have noticed too. Rye tends to be the second-most popular, and is quite dense compared to wheat, but has its own unique flavor and aroma. Corn and oats are other options, as is buckwheat, which is not a traditional grain, but is actually from a plant that is related to sorrel and rhubarb.

Sliced ciabatta on a wooden board

Gluten-Free
Gluten-free products have been on the rise lately, and when it comes to gluten-free bread, these tend to be made from four main starches; potato flour, tapioca starch, cornstarch and rice flour. While these are a great way for those who have a gluten allergy or Celiac disease to enjoy bread, those who do not suffer from these conditions are best off avoiding gluten-free bread, as they have high glycemic indexes, which means that they end up significantly raising blood sugar levels.

Different Uses for Different Breads
One of the reasons why there is so much choice in the bread aisle is because each bread tends to be best used for a specific purpose. For those who are making simple sandwiches, whole wheat slices are often best, as their flavor is quite minimal, allowing your sandwich fillings to really shine. Traditional flatbreads, such as pita bread and naan, are unleavened, meaning that they do not rise, and are chewier and denser, making them perfect to be stuffed. There are also many specialty breads out there, made from everything from sourdough to pumpernickel to rye, and each of these will have quite a distinct flavor, so do best when paired with stronger, more intense, fillings.

The bread aisle can often be quite confusing, which is why it is always a good idea to educate yourself on bread before heading out to do some shopping. For those who would like even more guidance on choosing bread, try visiting your local bakery rather than the grocery store, as the bakers will be on hand to provide you with in-depth advice.

Foods to Pack in Your Gym Bag

The foods that you eat before and after a workout are extremely important, as different foods will be able to fuel you in different ways. If you have been confused about the best snacks to pack in your gym bag, here are a few ideas.

Yoghurt

Pre-Workout: Greek Yoghurt with Berries
Greek yoghurt with berries is a great pre-workout snack, as the yoghurt contains a combination of whey and casein, meaning that you are getting a great balance of slow and fast-digesting proteins, which provide your muscles with the amino acids that they need during a workout. The yoghurt will take between four and six hours to digest, while the berries, which are a great source of carbohydrates, will take around two, giving your body long-lasting fuel.

Post-Workout: Tart Cherry Smoothie with Fresh Ginger and Whey Protein
Smoothies are always refreshing after a gruelling workout, and a tart cherry smoothie, along with some fresh ginger, will go a long way in helping to reduce inflammation, preventing any soreness. When it comes to the whey protein, around 30 grams of this is the optimum amount, as this will help to stimulate synthesis and growth within your muscles.

OROGOLD Foods to Pack in Your Gym Bag woman on grass eating banana.jpg

Pre-Workout: Bananas
Bananas are an easy snack to carry around, and are absolutely packed with potassium and complex carbohydrates. Both of these can significantly help with nerve and muscle function, so even if you do not enjoy eating bananas on their own, try adding them to a smoothie or some Greek yoghurt.

Post-Workout: An Orange and a Hardboiled Egg
Eggs are often considered to be the perfect food, and hardboiled eggs are extremely portable, and make for a great post-workout snack. The protein in the eggs will help to repair your muscles, but try to choose eggs that are organic and free-range, as studies have shown that these are usually much higher in the fatty acids that help to prevent any inflammatory damage that a vigorous workout may have caused. Oranges contain high levels of potassium and water, which will help to rehydrate you and replenish energy.

Pre-Workout: Oats with Almond Butter
If you are heading for a high-energy workout, then carbs will be your best friend, which is where the oatmeal comes in. However, in order to keep yourself feeling satisfied for the next few hours, cook the oats with some almond butter, as this is also a great source of magnesium, which is necessary for muscle contraction and relaxation.

Vegetable omelette

Post-Workout: Vegetable Omelette
Eggs are extremely high in leucine, which helps to trigger the synthesis of protein in muscles, which is why they are such a great post-workout food. By packing your omelette with lots of different vegetables, you will be providing your body with a wide range of vitamins and minerals to help it to recover, from red bell peppers for vitamin C to pineapples for bromelain.

When it comes to pre and post-workout snacks, remember that timing is everything. The ideal time to eat is around thirty minutes to three hours before a workout, and within twenty minutes after working out, as this is necessary to keep your muscles healthy.

Creative Ways to Replace the Carbs in Your Diet

Quinoa salad

It is now common knowledge that refined carbohydrates do not deserve a place on your plate, but without having an alternative to turn to, people are still consuming huge amounts of unhealthy carbs. From spiralized vegetable noodles to vegetable crusts on pizzas, here is some inspiration for the next time you are looking for a creative way to replace the carbohydrates in your diet.

Zero-Calorie Pasta
Zero-calorie pasta is made from starch that has been extracted from a yam-like vegetable, which is then mixed with water and limewater before being shredded into pasta shapes. Rather than being a trendy invention, these types of noodles are actually authentically traditional to Japan, and not only are they easy to prepare, but they are also satisfyingly tasty.

Zucchini noodles

Spiralized Vegetable Noodles 
The spiralizing trend has been around for a while now, and is a great way to replace noodles or pasta with vegetables. Spiralizers are easy to use, and only cost a few dollars, or you could even just begin by using a potato peeler, and there are so many vegetables that you can experiment with. For example, rather than eating a standard bowl of pasta that usually amounts to just under 600 calories, spiralized courgettes provide just 30 calories per portion, along with so many more vitamins and minerals.

Vegetable Rice
Rice is a staple food that accompanies just about every meal for so many cultures around the world, but this is another refined carbohydrate that often brings very little benefit to the body. For a healthier alternative, try turning one of your favorite vegetables into rice, using that instead of the traditional version. Whether you use cauliflowers or turnips, all you need for this is a food processor with a chopping or shredding blade, or you can even use a box grater to create the rice by hand. The rice that you will end up with will be extremely versatile, and can be used in so many different types of dishes, from simply roasted with garlic and lemon to flavorful and spicy in a Mexican-inspired dish.

Vegetable pizza crust

Vegetable Pizza Crusts 
Pizza is one of the hardest foods for many people to give up when they are trying to cut back on carbs, and while there may be many gluten-free varieties available, these do not usually even come close to comparing to a standard pizza crust. However, there are many ways in which you can create a crust from vegetables, all of which will hold their shape and structure while providing you with an extra boost of nutrients. From cauliflowers to sweet potatoes to red pepper and flax, if pizza is one of your favorite foods, these are some great ways to make your meals healthier.

A nutritious diet is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, but it can definitely be tricky finding alternatives for all of those staple foods that usually accompany meals. From zucchini pasta to cauliflower pizza crusts, give these dishes a try the next time you find yourself reaching for a bag of pasta or rice.

Five Reasons to Try Vegetarian

While the popularity of vegetarianism is rapidly on the rise, there are some who still feel as though giving up meat would be too big of a sacrifice to make. However, there are so many benefits that come with a vegetarian diet, so here are five reasons to persuade you to give vegetarianism a try.

Vegetarian

Slow Down the Aging Process
A study recently published in the British Medical Journal discovered that vegetarians outlive meat eaters by up to six years, which is hardly surprising considering all of the nutrients that come with a plant-based diet. Not only are these rich in fiber, but they are alo high in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients, all of which play individual roles in slowing down the aging process. In addition to this, a plant-based diet can also prevent, as well as reverse, certain chronic diseases, giving vegetarians a longer, and healthier, life.

Prevent the Three Biggest Killers
Heart disease is the number one killer out there, with cancer and strokes being the second and third, but a healthy, well-balanced vegetarian diet is able to protect the body from all three of these. In fact, doctors have even had success in unclogging arteries and reversing heart disease purely by prescribing a vegan diet.

Woman with ferret

Support the Environment
Countless studies have shown, and the United Nations has also confirmed, that eating meat is the reason behind some of the most serious environmental problems that we face today. For example, the meat industry is responsible for 40% more greenhouse gases than all of the cars, trucks and planes in the world combined, and are also linked to everything from land degradation to water pollution to climate change to loss of biodiversity.

Animal Welfare
While you may like to think that your meat has been raised on lush green pastures and happy farmyard homes, the reality is far from this, and if the general public really knew what happened in factory farms today, there would be many more vegetarians in the world. Animals that are commonly eaten, such as chickens and pigs, are actually known to be smarter than animals that are usually kept as pets, such as dogs and cats, so rather than supporting the abhorrent conditions that these creatures are kept in, give vegetarianism a try. It is believed that an individual who gives up meat is able to save around 100 animal lives each year, which is a good enough reason in itself for any true animal lover.

Woman standing on weighing scale

Weight Loss
More than two thirds of the general public are obese, but vegetarians on average tend to have a lower BMI, which is the measure of body fat, than meat eaters. Vegetarians are much less likely to be obese, and are significantly lighter than meat eaters, making vegetarianism the healthiest of weight loss diets.

As you can see, a vegetarian diet brings with it so many incredible benefits. Not only would you be making huge improvements to your own health, but you would also be supporting the world around you, so make 2017 the year in which you give vegetarianism a try.

Favorite Holiday Meals from Around the World

Christmas cookies

Festive food is a huge part of the holiday season, with Christmas dinner being a time-honored tradition all over the world. While this may be the case, the food that is eaten in different countries varies hugely, so for those wanting to add an international twist to their Christmas meal this year, these are some holiday meals from around the world that you can take some inspiration from.

Italy
When it comes to their Christmas dinner, Italy stands apart from the majority of European countries, because rather than feasting on roasted meat, they turn to the sea to put together their Feast of the Seven Fishes. Held on Christmas Eve, this tradition, which comes from Southern Italy, commemorates the wait for the birth of baby Jesus. As expected from its name, the feast features course after course of seafood, with everything from clams to oysters to scallops to many other types of fish.

Fiji
Fiji is known for its unique customs and traditions, and the Christmas meal here is no exception. A typical Christmas table in Fiji is usually bursting with color, as well as delicious aromas, with everything from fish in banana leaves, garlic stuffed chicken, and pork that has been slow cooked in an underground hot stone oven.

malouf

Israel
Turkey is a common feature in the Christmas dinners in Israel, but these birds are seasoned with a range of tantalizing spices, from nutmeg to cinnamon to pepper, before being stuffed with rice and almonds. Other popular dishes that often appear on the festive table are Qidreh, a lamb dish that has been cooked in a wood-fired oven, Malfouf, which is rice with ground lamb rolled in cabbage leaves, and sides of hummus, as well as Middle Eastern vegetables.

Peru
Christmas dinner in Peru is held on Christmas Eve, and just like in many other countries, roast turkey is the star of the feast. The Peruvian Christmas version usually sees the turkey stuffed with beef and peanuts, and then decorated with fresh cherries and pineapples. After the main meal, marzipan is often served up for dessert, alongside a steaming mug of thick hot chocolate.

Christmas dinner

Australia
When it comes to Christmas dinner, Australia tends to follow the British tradition turkey, but since it is summer rather than winter for them, roasting is not usually the cooking method of choice. Instead, Christmas barbecues are extremely common, and everything from turkey to ham to ribs is cooked up, with a cold Pavlova to follow for dessert.

Poland
A traditional Polish Christmas meal always features carp, and this freshwater fish used to be bought in advance and kept alive in buckets until Christmas Eve, to ensure maximum freshness. When it comes time for cooking, the carp is scaled and de-boned, before the flesh is salted and then gently fried in olive oil.

The traditions that you follow for your holiday meal are important, but this does not mean that you cannot mix it up a bit this year, borrowing a few elements from around the world. Whether this means adding a couple of Italian-inspired seafood dishes, or serving up some Peruvian marzipan and hot chocolate for dessert, there are many ways in which you can add some international flair to your Christmas dinner this year.

Enjoy These Energy Boosting Foods

Energy Boosting Foods
A lack of energy can usually be directly linked with nutrition, and while you may be tempted to turn to caffeine or sugar to perk you up during the day, you would be much better off opting for a more nutritious alternative instead. From the best nuts to snack on to the most nutritious meats to feast on, give some of these energy boosting foods a try the next time your body is feeling low.

Cashews, Almonds, Hazelnuts and Brazil Nuts
Most nuts make for a great healthy snack, but there are certain nuts that offer a much wider range of essential nutrients. Almonds boast large amounts of magnesium and a range of the B vitamins, which helps the body to convert food to energy much quicker, as do cashews, hazelnuts and brazil nuts. Nuts are also packed with protein, and brazil nuts, in particular, are a great source of selenium, which works as a natural mood booster.

Lean Meats
While plant-based foods are usually best for boosting energy, there can be times when you really crave some meat. In this case, lean meats, such as turkey, lean beef and skinless chicken, are the preferable choice, as they contain tyrosine. This amino acid helps to boost the levels of two specific brain chemicals, norepinephrine and dopamine, both of which will soon have you feeling much more focused and alert.

Bananas
Bananas make for a great snack, as not only are they already wrapped and protected, making them easy to carry around, but they are also filled with a plethora of nutrients. From the B vitamins to potassium to fiber, bananas are able to provide the body with long-term energy, as well as boost muscle function. For some added vitality, pair a banana with some yogurt as a tasty snack, as this combination of fiber and protein will be especially energizing.

Water
While not technically a food, studies have shown that dehydration is often the primary cause of fatigue, meaning that staying hydrated will keep your energy levels optimized. To treat your body to some extra antioxidants, and to satisfy any sweet drink cravings you may have, infuse a few slices of fruit into your water. Lemon is great for this, but other fruits also work well, so experiment with your favorite flavors.

Eggs
Egg yolks are rich in the B vitamins, which convert food into energy, and they also contain plenty of vitamin D which supports bone health. The protein that eggs contain makes them especially useful when you feel as though your muscles need a pick-me-up, such as after an intense workout session. If you are trying to cut back on the calories, use one whole egg along with two egg whites, as this combination is a fantastic lean form of energy.

With the hectic lives that many lead these days, feeling low on energy is all too common. While quick fixes may seem like the best option, do your body a favor and try making a meal with some of these healthy but energizing foods instead.

Traditional Foods to Enjoy in Spain

Spain is known for its vibrant culinary scene, and there are many spots around the country that are considered to be top foodie destinations. From the sweet to the spicy, these traditional dishes should all make it onto your must-try list the next time you are in Spain.

gazpacho

Gazpacho
Spain grows the sweetest of tomatoes, and it is this very ingredient that is the star of gazpacho – a chilled tomato soup made with ultra-ripe tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, bread, peppers and cucumber. Blitzed until silky smooth, this tangy and refreshing soup is always popular during the summer months, and you will usually find a fresh jar of gazpacho on every tapas bar counter top.

Paella
Paella was born in Valencia in the mid-19th century, and Valencians today proudly claim that it is possible to eat a different version of this dish every day of the year, as there are so many varieties out there. While this may be the case, the most important element to a paella is the rice used, with bomba or calasaparra rice being two varieties that are grown on the east coast of Spain, and are known for being particularly effective at absorbing all of the other flavors in the dish.

chorizo

Chorizo
A flavorful pork sausage with plenty of garlic and Spanish smoked paprika, chorizo comes in many different forms, and is one of the most versatile foods in the country. From sweet to spicy to smoked to cured, chorizo is used in a number of different dishes, sometimes just for flavor but often as the star ingredient. While there are many different types of chorizo to be found in Spain, Chorizo Zamorano and Chorizo Riojano are both protected varieties, and most definitely worth trying.

Cochinillo
Known in English as suckling pig, cochinillo features a pig that has been slaughtered when it is under a month old, meaning that it weighs just six or seven kilograms, and, when slow-roasted, the meat is unbelievably tender. Roasted in huge wood-fired ovens, the meat is usually cut with the edge of an earthenware plate to showcase its tenderness, and, if you want to ensure that you are tasting an authentic variety, be sure that the pork that you are eating has come from a registered farm in the Segovia province, which is where the dish originated.

crema catalana

Crema Catalana
While many cannot tell the difference between the Spanish crema catalana and the French crème brulee, there are a few subtle aspects that set them apart. While the French version is served warm, the Catalan version is eaten cold, and features a custard that has been infused with cinnamon and lemon rather than vanilla. This makes it beautifully refreshing, and the perfect way to satisfy your sweet tooth on a hot Spanish day.

Pulpo a la Gallega
Pulpo a la Gallega is a dish that may not be as famous as paella and chorizo, but it is one that will truly excite each and every one of your taste buds. This dish originated in the picturesque Galicia region, which is known for their incredible seafood, and consists of Galician octopus that has been cooked with olive oil and paprika. While this may seem simple, it is the quality of the Galician octopus that makes this dish a stand-out, meaning that it cannot be authentically replicated with octopus from elsewhere.

Spain is home to a diverse and exciting culinary scene, especially in recent years as modern Spanish chefs have been taking traditional dishes to new levels. The way in which each Spanish dish has its own variety depending on the region in which you eat it is part of what makes Spanish cuisine so beautiful, so do take the time to enjoy the unique flavors that come with each dish.

The Real Spanish Tapeo

Tapas

Quintessentially Spanish, tapeo culture is at the heart of Spain’s heritage, and lively tapas bars can be found throughout the country. Rather than being a way of cooking, tapas is more about a way of eating, signifying socializing with friends and bonding with loved ones.

What is Tapas?
Tapas has made a name for itself all over the world, and is essentially a wide variety of small-portioned snacks that are traditionally served alongside alcoholic beverages. Tapas comes in all shapes and forms, from hot or cold to skewered or bubbling in clay pots to finger bites and sandwiches, and every region of Spain will have their own range of unique local tapas dishes.

The Best Time To Tapear
Tapas is such an important part of Spanish culture that there is even a verb, tapear, to describe the act of going for tapas. When it comes to the best time to tapear, this is usually in the early afternoon, between noon and 2pm, as this falls just before the Spanish lunchtime, and is when all of the local tapas bars compete with counters piled high with tempting fragrant bites. Each tapas bar will put their own unique spin on the dishes served, which is why visiting a few different tapas bars is always a popular activity in Spain.

Tapas Etiquette
Tapeo culture has its very own etiquette, and while a faux pas will not be frowned upon heavily, locals will appreciate your knowledge on this. It is usually customary for visitors to a tapas bar to not eat more than two tapas at one place, as the whole idea behind tapeo is it being a sort of gastronomic bar crawl. Since you are only going to be trying a couple of dishes at each place, you need to pay attention to how they complement each other, ordering dishes that work well together rather than those that feature opposing flavors. Tapas is usually eaten at the bar while standing, and, when it comes to paying the bill, Spaniards usually practice convida, which is where everybody pays for a round.

Popular Tapas Dishes
There are thousands of different tapas varieties out there, with the only limit being the chef’s imagination. Gambas are prawns that are sauteed in various sauces, from peppercorn to chopped chili peppers, while croquettes are a common fried dish that can be found in homes all across Spain. Patatas bravas are fried potato cubes that are usually served with a spicy salsa, and is another dish that is served up by the majority of tapas bars out there. Chorizo is another ingredient that is beautifully showcased in many tapas dishes, from chorizo al vino, in which it is slowly cooked in wine, to chorizo a la sidra, in which the chorizo is cooked in cider.

While tapas restaurants may be found all over the world, the only way to truly experience the tapeo culture is by visiting Spain. From the authenticity of the food served to the atmosphere of the bars, tapas culture is a Spanish tradition that is still thriving today.

Eat More Oily Fish

Salmon

Scientific interest in oily fish first arose when researchers discovered that Eskimos, who have a diet that is primarily made up of oily fish, experience a much lower than average rate of heart attacks, strokes and other diseases. Since then, the many health benefits that oily fish can bring to the body have been heavily documented, making this a food that you should be making the effort to eat much more.

What Are Oily Fish?
Oily fish are specific species of fish that contain certain oils that run throughout their body, while white fish only contains oil in its liver. Some of the most readily available of oily fish would be mackerel, sardines, herring, trout, salmon, kipper and whitebait, and these count as an oily fish whether they are fresh, frozen, smoked or canned. While fresh tuna is also considered to be an oily fish, canned tuna is not, as the canning process takes its levels down to that of a white fish, making it not as beneficial.

Highly Nutritious
Oily fish is the best natural source of omega-3 fatty acids that you will find, and these are essential for a wide variety of functions within the body, as well as the brain, and have been directly linked to a reduction in many diseases. In addition to the omega-3 fatty acids, oily fish also contains a variety of other nutrients that the average person usually does not consume enough of, such as vitamin D, some of the B vitamins, and selenium.

Health Benefits
Oily fish bring about some incredible health benefits, such as the prevention of heart disease and up to a 50% reduced risk of rheumatoid arthritis, both of which have been scientifically proven. The omega-3 fatty acids in oily fish also help to protect the vision, as well as improve the memory and inhibit the growth of oral and skin cancers. Pregnant women that consume oily fish in the last few months of their pregnancy will also be able to boost their child’s sensory, motor and cognitive development, giving him or her a fantastic start to life.

How Much to Eat
The recommended amount of oily fish to eat each week is between one and two portions, with each portion weighing around 140 grams. The main downside to oily fish is that they contain certain pollutants that are present throughout the environment, usually as a result of industrial processes and household fires, and while these pollutants will not have an immediate effect on your health, high levels of these in your body can lead to problems arising over time.

In some parts of the world, oily fish features heavily in the diet, and these areas experience a significantly reduced amount of heart disease and other health issues. With so many different types of oily fish out there, it is an easy food to consume more of, and there are a number of exciting ways in which you can cook the fish to make it appealing even to those that are not usually fans of seafood.