Best Fabrics for Skin

Woman picking out a cotton tee

We’re used to a dizzying variety of fabrics in being used to make out clothing and each one of them seeming to have different instructions for care. This top needs to be washed in warm, but not too warm water while the bottom needs to be washed in cold water and hung out to line dry. One load of laundry can end up feeling like fifteen before you’re done. All of the fabrics do have their uses though. Not all of those fabrics are necessarily the best for your skin though. While we may be used to marathon clothes washing, We think you might want to consider going through your wardrobe and consider expanding the fabric types in particular directions. It should help simplify the washing and might even benefit your skin.

Cotton
Plain and simple cotton is one of the best things for your skin. It needs relatively little treatment to be used as clothing. It breathes. The fabric itself is highly versatile as the weave often determines how soft it feels and how durable it is. Cotton clothing is also simple to deal with when cleaning most of the time. People have used cotton for clothing for centuries for the very reason that it is so good at what it does. Remember that we’re talking about plain cotton clothing though. Cotton blends use synthetic fibers that get various treatments as part of the creation. The blend itself also has to be made to mesh well together. This isn’t necessarily bad for you, but those with more sensitive skin are likely to react in some cases.

Silk
Everyone knows about the luxury of silk as assuredly as they know of the versatility of cotton. Silk isn’t quite a visually durable as cotton can be due to the particular weaves it uses, but as a material it is often stronger. The issues with silk mainly come from snagging. However, it is dyed in an array of beautiful colors that not only take to the colors, but keep silk’s unique shine. The material is also luxuriously soft to the touch on skin. A part of what makes silk so good for your skin is the same thing that makes full cotton clothing good for your skin: it tends to be almost entirely natural. This makes it suitable for even the most sensitive skins. If you can’t take to a particular dye, then it is easy enough to avoid with without skipping the entire material.

Fleeces
Yes, infamously scratchy sweaters get made from wool, a fleece, but not all fleeces are made equally. What they all share in common is that they get sheared off of animals from the world over. Lots of names get applied to the individual fleeces though. Angora, cashmere, mohair, and just plain wool are all kinds of fleece. The exact texture tends to vary from species to species. Anyone who has touched cashmere and angora can vouch for how soft those are next to the infamous sweaters of legend. But even plain wool can be soft and warm given the right handling. The trick is finding fleece clothing that feels good to your skin and doesn’t cause any sort of reaction. You’ll then have comfortable, warm, and tasteful clothing to wear that won’t harm your skin.

Nature typically seems to provide good solutions for a lot of things. This is especially true when it comes to selecting materials that are kind to your skin. You should favor natural fabrics over synthetics if you’re truly dedicated to caring for your skin. Less processing means less of a chance for a bit of fabric to be exposed to potential reaction causing chemicals. There are plenty of nature fabrics out there that you can try as well. Some are like fleeces and others are made from unexpected plant sources like bamboo. Experiment, but keep Mother Nature in mind.

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